Lawsuits involving alleged violations by former employees of non-competition agreements are often hotly contested and involve injunctive relief. These cases can be challenging for the employer to obtain relief because covenants not to compete are governed by statutory law requiring these restrictive covenants to be reasonable as to time, geographical area, and scope of activity

The equitable constructive trust. In Texas, a court acting in equity may impose a constructive trust upon property held by a party to a transaction that belongs to another. The Austin Court of Appeals recently used this remedy to impose a constructive trust upon life insurance proceeds that, under a divorce decree, should have

Corporate and trust litigation can be tricky. In a recent Texas case, the Corpus Christi Court of Appeals held that trust beneficiaries failed to plead facts showing they had the legal right–standing–to bring a lawsuit on behalf of their own trusts. As a result, they lost their case on summary judgment.
The case of

The constructive trust is a powerful weapon that plaintiffs can use against defendants who have breached their fiduciary duties or committed fraud. In one Texas case, the court of appeals actually affirmed the trial court’s award to the plaintiffs of all the assets in the business owned by the defendant who breached his fiduciary duties

Texas Corporate directors and officers owe fiduciary duties of obedience, loyalty and due care to the corporation.  Gearhart Indus., Inc. v. Smith Intern., Inc., 741 F.2d 707, 719 (5th Cir. 1984); Loy v. Harter, 128 S.W.3d 397, 407 (Tex. App.—Texarkana 2004, pet. denied). In this context, directors and officers are probably most often found

Introduction. In Texas, officers and directors of a corporation owe fiduciary duties to the corporation. “Three broad duties stem from the fiduciary status of corporate directors; namely, the duties of obedience, loyalty, and due care. Ubelaker at 781–82. The duty of obedience requires a director to avoid committing ultra vires acts, i.e., acts beyond

The Texas legislature made numerous changes to state laws in the estate planning area including to statutory provisions that govern wills, trusts, probate, and financial powers of attorney. One substantive change to the Durable Power of Attorney Act limits the scope of the fiduciary duties owed by the appointed agent to his principal (person granting the power) under a financial power of attorney.

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